Network

Words to Thrive by…

Posted on December 10, 2012. Filed under: Books, Branding, Business, Career, Civility, Corporate Ethics, Environmental Disasters, Field Guides, Job-Seeking, Life, Manners, Network, Newly-minted Graduates, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Story empowers vision.  Vision empowers momentum.  Momentum empowers success.”

– Kathy Corday –

[Guest Speaker, 85 Broads’ Leadership Circle Storytelling Workshop, 6 December 2012]

________

Regardless of how you feel on any given day, know that you make a choice about how you face the world.  Know that moments pass, good or bad.  Know that you are the constant in your life, whether alone or paired.  Know that anything you have ever truly wanted to achieve in life, you have.  Know that those things you thought you wanted to achieve in life but did not were of little importance to you.  Know that goals may change.

Your story empowers your vision of your life.  The vision you have of your life empowers your focused momentum.  Your focused momentum empowers your success.  Know this: you are enough.

 ____
What’s Your Story?
Please feel free to use this space to share your insights and feedback on the importance of communicating your story in a clear and concise format.  
I look forward to your comments…

(more…)

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Turning the Page…

Posted on January 12, 2011. Filed under: Books, Branding, Business, Career, Civility, Corporate Ethics, Field Guides, Job-Seeking, Life, Manners, Network, Newly-minted Graduates, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills, women |

With every new year comes the opportunity to open a new chapter in your life: a challenge to dream big, work hard, and learn from any setbacks you may experience along the way. Life is an amazing experience if you let it be.  Face your fears, risk doing the thing that you’ve always wanted to do, and try not to take yourself too seriously.  Most of all, be sure to take a moment, now and then, to look back on the trail you have blazed and appreciate just how far you have come.

Happy 2011!  May it be your breakout and breakthrough year!

Be well. Be Yourself.  You are enough!

 

© Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide®, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide ® with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. http://www.alchemymediagroup.com.

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Welcome to My Inner Circle

Posted on November 11, 2010. Filed under: Branding, Business, Career, Civility, Corporate Ethics, Field Guides, Job-Seeking, Life, Manners, Network, Newly-minted Graduates, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills, women |

In life, you stand in the middle of three concentric circles; the better your ability to understand each of these circles, the better your outlook on life.  New to Chicago, I had taken a sales position whereby this concept was described to me.  I share it with you now as a way of paying forward a key piece of knowledge that literally changed my life for the better.

The three circles are as follows:

  • The Innermost Circle…

Circle of Control = YOU

  • The Middle Circle…

Circle of Influence = YOUR ABILITY TO PERSUADE

  • The Outer Circle…

Circle of Serendipity = BEYOND YOUR CONTROL OR INFLUENCE

At the center of the Innermost Circle, the Circle of Control, stands you and you alone.  This circle is all about you: what you think, what you do, and how you feel about what you think and what you do.  These are the only things in life over which you have direct control: your thoughts and your actions.  It is up to you to make the most of yourself here.  You can choose to be the active creator of your life.  Or, you can assume the position of a victim, by blaming others for your failures.  As an active creator, you are accountable and responsible for thoughts and actions, while a victim chooses to make denial a part of his or her everyday experience.  In short, you create the You that the world sees each day by choosing to be the best version of yourself that you can be, and by choosing to do the best that you can do.

Sitting between those things that you control, and those things which are beyond your control is the Middle Circle, the Circle of Influence.  It is here that you may or may not be able to persuade someone to think or act in a manner that would please you.  The old saying, “You can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make him drink,” comes to mind here.  You do not control what others will think, do or say, but you can improve your odds for a positive outcome by considering their feelings and circumstances.  Act in a way that exhibits compassion and grace.  While you may not persuade everyone to go along with your ideas, you are likely to have better interactions both in business and in life.

Finally, the Outer Circle, the Circle of Serendipity.  Here is where life happens while you are making other plans. You can welcome or dread the arrival of these unpredictable events outcomes in your life.  Regardless of how you choose to characterize life’s surprises, there is little sense in worrying yourself over them.  Good or bad, you are on the sidelines when it comes to these situations.  Better to keep moving forward in your life aided by the knowledge that you can control how you choose to react to these events when they arise.

Effective management of your own Circles of Control and Influence seems to greatly increase the likelihood that the majority of unpredictable events that come your way will be positive and benefit you.  The more positive energy you exert, the more compassionate interactions you enjoy with the people in your life, the more gracious you are in accepting disappointments; the more likely you are to be blessed by a welcome surprise delivered at your feet when you find yourself standing in the Circle of Serendipity.

The three Circles of Control, Influence, and Serendipity serve as an easy way to measure the day-to-day circumstances that come your way in life.  Make it a habit to filter the choices and decisions you make using these three circles as guidelines. You will soon discover that the energy once wasted on trying to control and influence those things beyond your control and/or influence is now free to engage in the things over which you do have control and influence.  Your approach to life can be just that simple.

Be well. Be Yourself.  You are enough!

© Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide®, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide ® with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. http://www.alchemymediagroup.com.

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CHANGE AGENTS: Now Recruiting!

Posted on June 22, 2010. Filed under: Books, Branding, Business, Career, Civility, Corporate Ethics, Environmental Disasters, Field Guides, Job-Seeking, Life, Manners, Network, Newly-minted Graduates, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills, Uncategorized, women |

There’s a reason why BP Amoco is ruining the planet: short-sightedness.  It seems epidemic today.  Whether it is a matter of how and where to drill, or a matter of how to handle business relationships, companies seem to be focused on short-term improvements to their bottom line rather than lay the groundwork for long-term rewards.  Is it a lack of ethics?  Is it a sense of entitlement?  Or, is it just poor manners?  While I cannot solve the problems of many of these afflicted companies, I have thrown my hat into the ring to return a bit of civility back to the business world.  My feeling is that now more than ever, our planet needs us to take a good long look at ourselves.

Companies that are sick with short-sightedness are no different than those voted the best by their employees; both types are comprised by the people who run them.  With my new pocket book, The Networking Field Guide®: Essential Social Skills for Business, I have assembled a modern style guide to civility.  Among its pages, I share my own field-tested methods for becoming more effective at making meaningful connections with the people each of us needs in order to succeed.  The book takes the long-term view that our business relationships need to be cultivated long before we need them, then nurtured with honesty, and honored above all.

What ever happened to teamwork? Offering and listening to constructive criticism?  Joining with our colleagues and clients to create the win-win? Job performance and merit increases need to include measurements of open communication and effective teamwork.  Management needs to set an example of good leadership, sportsmanship and ethics from the top down.  It is imperative that the company policy reflect the intolerance for those who throw a blind eye at constructive criticism, those who wantonly abandon a sense of corporate conscience, and who thereby place the company at risk.  Moreover, management needs to reflect a more expansive view of the big picture and commit to a strategy whereby the projected outcomes, be they short-term or long-term, favor a number of interested parties without causing irreparable harm to their competitors or the environment in which they operate.  By looking for the win-win, everyone will come out better in the end.

An admitted optimist, I believe that a better business world is possible.  It can happen.  Change may come one person at a time, but things can change.  We need only make the decision, each and every one of us, that the outlandish selfishness that has brought our world economy to the brink of collapse, that has raised a generation of children convinced of their own entitlement, and that has lead to the pollution of our oceans with millions of gallons of oil can be stopped.  It seems a bit too simple, perhaps, to suggest that my small, little pocket book might be a tool in shoring up the vast leak of personal ethics.  Or, perhaps, it may be just that simple.  The Networking Field Guide®: Essential Social Skills for Business may, in fact, be just enough to start the conversation: a catalyst to better social graces, to more meaningful relationships, and to more well-meaning corporate citizens.  If only one person buys just one book and forges one ethically-sound business relationship as a result of reading it; change can come, if we choose it.

Until the next time, this is your Networking Field Guide® reminding you to be well, be confident, and be yourself.

© Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide®, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide ® with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Just Be, Man…

Posted on June 9, 2010. Filed under: Books, Business, Career, Field Guides, Life, Network, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills |

Ever dated someone who pulled the wool over your eyes?  You fall head-over-heels only to be sent over the edge but a revelation of their true nature?  You probably didn’t like or even appreciate the experience.  What’s true in love is true in business: a fake is a fake, and no one likes being played for a fool.

Recently, I observed a career workshop in Chicago hosted by representatives of the Career Development Center at the University of Southern California.  The evening was designed to allow the alumni participants the opportunity to get their most perplexing job-seeking questions answered by some of the top human resource executives from Chicago’s leading corporations including McDonald’s, PepsiCo, Zurich Insurance, and Ernst & Young. I think the best description of the night might be speed-dating for the business professional.

Rather than detail the evening’s agenda, let me jump to the essence of it: be yourself.  Perhaps the biggest surprise to me was that every representative, without fail, mentioned his or her desire to have job applicants present their true selves rather than resort to a performance of the person that they think the firm wants to hire.  This is important stuff.

As I mention in my book, The Networking Field Guide®: Essential Social Skills for Business, when we are ourselves, we will always be 100%.

“The way you see the world, the way you feel about what you see,
and the way you react to that world is unique to you and you alone.
Your strengths are many and your weaknesses not nearly as dire as
you might want to believe.”      [See pp. 24 & 25 in the pocket-book.]

Imitation of any kind reduces us to less than 100% of ourselves and short-changes everyone.  Better to be yourself and let people get to know the real you; the person that he or she will be working next to, collaborating with on projects, and counting on to get the job done.  While you may not be perfect, you will be authentic.

When we present a false image of ourselves, the charade only lasts so long.  One day, in the not-so-distant future, the façade slips away and our true self is revealed.  Co-workers who thought they knew you are surprised or can become angry at the discovery.  Especially, in the workplace, to learn that the person that he or she thought they knew is nothing but charlatan can have ramifications much more damaging than a dating disappointment.  Such a deliberate deception can be detrimental to your job and ultimately to your career.  Like gum on your shoe during a hot summer day, it tends to stick with you and ruin your reputation.

I urge you to be willing to risk being yourself with the knowledge that there will be an employer who will welcome your unique personality and skill-set, and reward you for being you. Wouldn’t you rather be hired and promoted for who you are?  I thought so.

Until the next time, this is your Networking Field Guide reminding you to be well, be confident, and be yourself.

© Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide®, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide ™ with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. For more information on seminars and workshops, visit us at http://www.thenetworkingfieldguide.com or http://www.alchemymediagroup.com

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It’s a Done Deal: We’re Living the Dream!

Posted on May 1, 2010. Filed under: Books, Business, Career, Field Guides, Life, Network, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills, Uncategorized |

Snap!  Just like that the web sites for Alchemy Media Group, Inc. and The Networking Field Guide(R) are up and running.  We never cease to be amazed by how quickly we can accomplish something when we when set our minds to it. We are living our dream!

Initially, the Alchemy site serves as a gateway to The Networking Field Guide(R); it is full of information about the pocket book, the author, and a little background on how the book came to be.  You take a peek at the Table of Contents, Corday’s Top 10 List, and a sample chapter entitled, Be Yourself.  You’ll discover information on our Presentations and Workshops, News and Events, and a selection of Corday’s recommended reading list in Resources.  Moreover, Testimonials about the book are also shared.  It’s all at your fingertips!

With at least one image per page, the site communicates with a design aesthetic and loads quickly.  Navigation buttons at the bottom of each page keep you only one click away from whatever you want to see.  Finally, a site map is provided should you prefer to have a bird’s eye view of what is available.  Best of all, the site has been designed to load easily on a variety of platforms.

Here are the web addresses:

  • thenetworkingfieldguide.com

Please stop by and have a look.  We think you’ll like it as much as we do!

Until the next time, this is your Networking Field Guide reminding you to be well, be confident, and be yourself.

© Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide™, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide ™ with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. For more information visit http://www.thenetworkingfieldguide.com.

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Live & let LIVE!

Posted on April 30, 2010. Filed under: Books, Business, Career, Field Guides, Life, Network, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills, Uncategorized |

The Alchemy Media Group, Inc.  web site is about to go LIVE!  With the technical expertise of my Web Masters at Grace Printing in Chicago, the online presence for Alchemy is about to become a realization. Designed with you in mind, the layout is clean and easy to navigate.  Moreover, we will revise the Procurement Page for the book to coordinate with the sleekness of the main web site design.

Although our fingers may be worn, our creative juices are free-flowing.  We push forward and remain focused.  We are so close to a full launch, we can taste it!

Please stay tuned for more information, I’ll keep you posted!

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RITES OF SPRING

Posted on April 2, 2010. Filed under: Books, Branding, Business, Career, Field Guides, Life, Network, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills |

If you’re a resident of Chicago like I am, you will be the first to understand why this blog entry has been delayed by a week.  What a week, indeed.  We’ve been enjoying some unseasonably warm temperatures and I, for one, love it.  If there’s one thing that teaches us Chicagoans about seizing opportunity when it knocks, it’s great weather that arrives unexpectedly after a bitter cold winter.  Applied to business, it is knowing when to the tide seems to be turning in your direction and being poised to make the most of it.

Effective networking for business allows us to make our friends before we need them. It allows us to begin to lay the groundwork for the key business relationships that will act as conduits of information: leads, research, teaming strategies, potential obstacles, and potential allies.  By learning how to better connect to the people you need to know you will not only make yourself a more effective team player, but your will endear yourself to your employer that much more than someone who simply sits back and waits for the work to float magically through the front door.

Perhaps the biggest mistake that businesses make, regardless of their size, is to maintain the misguided impression that they do not need to market.  Thinking that your brand will continue to be recognizable in your industry because orders are up and the firm is working near capacity.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  Studies have shown over the years that it takes five times the effort to acquire a client as it does to keep one.  Five times the effort!  Clients will expand your market share through referrals if they are happy, but take them for granted and they will tell a different tale.  Therefore, even if your firm boasts a host of clients it is imperative that you continue to market to them.  Networking is an essential component to maintaining quality client relationships.

More is to be gained by continuing to learn about your clients interests.  Networking allows you to stay abreast of developments occurring with both of your firms.  Networking allows you to expand your level of services (e.g. market) by providing a bird’s-eye view into the needs and desires of your existing clients in addition to offering clues to how to connect to new clients.  The idea of best practices stems from the exchanges of information that identify key processes that offer proven results again and again.  Networking allows you to sift through the ideological rhetoric of a given industry and get down to the essence of what a firm really needs.  Such information cannot be gleaned from sitting on the sidelines, you have to step up.

With the seasons changing, there is a perfect opportunity for you to take stock of what processes and procedures have been working for you both in and out of the office.  Take a good honest look at yourself and ask what is it that you think is making you successful, and do not be afraid to address the things that do not.  I have written THE NETWORKING FIELD GUIDE™: Essential Social Skills for Business for myself too.  It enables me to follow my own advice and reevaluate my own strengths and weaknesses.  We may never be perfect, but each year that the sun emerges from behind the clouds, melts the snow, allows the trees to bud, and the flowers to bloom we all receive the gift of the chance to begin anew.  It is up to us to seize the opportunity.

Before signing off, I would like to thank a few members of my network.  First, to the local office of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), for providing me with the opportunity to lead a Networking Workshop at the Kauffer Members Resource Center.  We had a dynamic group of people who seemed to gain a lot from our exchange.  My network expanded and I am looking forward to their feedback as to how the techniques we discussed and tested that evening are working in their everyday pursuits of business relationships.  A special thank you to Linda Swenson for her efforts in publicizing and organizing the event.

Next, I would like to express my gratitude to the ACE Mentor Program Chicago for a terrific program whereby young high school students interested in architecture, engineering a construction services teamed with local companies to create the design projects that were presented at the UIC Pavilion last week.  Many of these students will be the first in their families to attend a four-year college.  ACE Chicago has provided over $500,000 in scholarships to support the ongoing dreams of many of these students to become future architects, engineers and project managers.  Congratulations to those students who received internships with local companies and to the students awarded scholarships this year. [www.acementor.org/chicago]

Crain’s Chicago Business deserves a note of gratitude for their Seventh Annual Women Business Owners Tell All held on March 24th at Chicago’s Mid-America Club, sponsored by Harris Bank.  Crain’s Anchor and Reporter, Lisa Leiter moderated a panel of four dynamic business woman including Angelika Coghlan, President and Managing Partner, Catwalk Consulting (she is also the President of the Chicago Chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners); and Chinwe Onyeagoro, Principal and Co-Founder, O-H Community Partners Ltd. (OHcp).  I learned about this event from one of my newest networking partners, Jeffrey Simon, a certified financial planner. Thank you, Jeffrey.

[Stay up to date about future events by visiting http://www.ccbevents@crain.com]

Finally, a special thank you to Candace Jordan.  You may have heard of Candace, she’s a force majeur.  One of the most generous people that I have had the privilege to know. Unbeknownst to me, Candace requested a bit of information about my pocket book, THE NETWORKING FIELD GUIDE™ and was nice enough to include a lovely mention of it in her blog, Candid Candace.  A thoughtful gesture to be sure.  Thank you, Candace.

[www.candidcandace.com]

Until next week, this is your Networking Field Guide reminding you to be well, be confident, and be yourself.

© Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide™, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide ™ with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. For more information visit http://www.thenetworkingfieldguide.com.

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ARE YOU A SCARED RABBIT?

Posted on March 19, 2010. Filed under: Books, Branding, Business, Career, Field Guides, Life, Network, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills |

Scared rabbits – they freeze up like a still life when feeling their most vulnerable, or they scamper off to a safe corner to escape what they perceive to be an imminent threat.  When faced with the idea of attending a networking function, be it a small gathering or a large convention, many people exhibit the appearance of sacred rabbits.  I am here to tell you that everyone has felt like a scared rabbit on one occasion or another.  Be it the celebrity caught in the scrutinizing spotlight of public opinion when dealing with marital indiscretions, or the person who is new to the group and  needs to make friends.  We are all capable of owning the feeling of fear of rejection, and we are all capable of overcoming this fear.

Here are few tips to banish your scared rabbit back down into its hole, so you can connect to the people you need to know to succeed.  My first tip is simple: BREATHE.  Yes, that’s right.  Remember to breathe.  It is this simple but often forgotten step that trips you up the most when you are facing your fears.  Heavy breathing affects your posture, your body temperature, your composure, and even your ability to speak clearly and confidently.  Not breathing is even worse.  I doubt you would like to be the person who caught everyone’s attention by fainting due to lack of oxygen to your brain.

Breathe better and you will come across better.  When you find that your nerves are getting the best of you and your breathing is labored, find a way to remove yourself from the situation for a moment.  Once you have found a quiet corner, a restroom stall, or a space out on the sidewalk, start by taking a slow deep breath.  If your heart is still racing, try exhaling all the air out of your lungs first, and then breathing in slowing to fill your lungs.  In no time, you should feel yourself calming down.

What do you do if your anxiety seems too determined to let go of its hold on you?  Or, your heart feels like it’s about to pop out of your chest? Fear not!  In this case, try to mentally stop your heart.  By mentally concentrating on stopping your heart (which you cannot truly do), your heart will automatically begin to slow down, and your breathing will become more regular.  As your breathing becomes more regular, you will begin to relax.

Ahh.  Feels good, doesn’t it!  Once you are breathing normally, you will have learned two things about yourself.  One, you now have the power to take charge of the effect that your fear has on your breathing.  Two, how nice it feels to breathe normally.  This latter point is important, because people who are self-confident tend to exhibit regular breathing.  This simple and basic step is an easy building block to gaining more networking self-confidence.  By managing the pace of your breathing, without even knowing it, you have given yourself a pat on the back and are ready to go.

I hope this will help you.  More  to come next week.  In the meantime, be well, be confident, and be yourself.  You are enough.

© Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide™, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide ™ with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Hello, World! Here’s my new baby: a pocket-book! THE NETWORKING FIELD GUIDE™: Essential Social Skills for Business

Posted on March 11, 2010. Filed under: Books, Branding, Business, Career, Field Guides, Job-Seeking, Life, Network, Pocket-Books, Recruitment, Self-Help, Social Skills, women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Announcing the arrival of my new baby: a pocket-book!  THE NETWORKING FIELD GUIDE™: Essential Social Skills for Business has just been published by Alchemy Media Group, Inc.   I am thrilled to share my good news with you as this has been a labor of love for me for the past 4 years.

THE NETWORKING FIELD GUIDE™: Essential Social Skills for Business is a 150-page, pocket-sized, 1/4-inch thick manual of informative techniques to better connect you to the people you need to know to succeed.  Printed on 80# coated paper in 4-color, the guide features color highlights and tab blocks.  The soft-cover consists of gold foil-stamped, black vinyl leatherette bringing the guide’s total weight to a mere 4.1 ounces.  THE NETWORKING FIELD GUIDE™ tucks easily tucks easily into the pocket of a suit, purse, computer bag, backpack, or pair of jeans.  Available for purchase on the web at http://www.thenetworkingfieldguide.com, the suggested retail price is $13.95 plus tax, shipping and handling.  A red velveteen gift bag can be included with an order for an additional $2.00 each.  Enclosed in its own cellophane bag, each pocket-book ships in a sturdy cardboard box for safe transit via the U. S. Postage Service.

Tailored to meet the needs of the recent college graduate, post-graduate professional, managers promoted to rainmaker, and job-seekers in transition, the field guide has something for everyone making it both insightful and inspirational.  Easy on the eyes, the text is color-keyed with blue headings, green highlights of key points, and blue color tabs for easy navigation between topics.  Beginning with Corday’s Top 10 Tips, THE NETWORKING FIELD GUIDE™ outlines the basic social skills that are compulsory to initiating meaningful business relationships.  Tips are outlined initially then fleshed out with meaningful examples.  Five more tips are presented in a second outline then explained in more detail in the following pages.  Finally, specific event scenarios are explored in detail to enable successful outcomes for these potentially problematic situations.

THE NETWORKING FIELD GUIDE™ shares my perspective on the interpersonal skills that I feel are necessary to connect you to the key people in your industry once you leave the comfort zone of your desk, computer, or cell phone.  My knowledge has been cultivated through my own professional career pursuits aided by the mentoring of generous business leaders who have crossed my path.  Having been fortunate enough to enjoy a multi-faceted career with some of the world’s most prestigious companies, I credit my ability to effectively network as being paramount to my success.  Moreover, my network empowers me to easily adapt to the dynamic of an ever-changing economic landscape.

Future postings on this blog will explore topics taken from my book.  I will post again within a week.

Welcome to my world!

© Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide Blog , 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kathy Corday and The Networking Field Guide Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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